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The relationship you have with your husband or wife is likely more significant than the ones you enjoy with your friends and family members. After all, not only is your spouse your lifelong companion, but he or she also offers an abundance of support. If your partner sustains a serious injury in an automobile accident, you may experience a tremendous sense of loss.

Supporting a spouse through the recovery process can be tough. Fortunately, in New Hampshire, individuals who have suffered injuries may pursue reasonable compensation from the negligent person who caused them. State law also allows a physically uninjured spouse to file a derivative loss of consortium claim.

Loss of consortium 

The marital relationship is both special and important. Spouses provide love, companionship, friendship and affection for each other. They also help contribute to household duties, financial support and other essential activities. If a sudden accident leaves your husband or wife with life-altering injuries, you may miss out on the best parts of your marriage. While no amount of money is likely to fill the void completely, a successful loss of consortium claim may help you cope.

Relevant factors 

When evaluating a loss of consortium claim, judges in the Granite State weigh some factors. Here are three relevant considerations:

  • The scope of lost marital benefits
  • The remaining length of each spouse’s life
  • The stability and quality of the marriage

Before proceeding with a loss of consortium claim, you must ponder each factor carefully. You must also understand that the defendant may attempt to paint your marriage in a bad light. As such, you should be ready to advocate aggressively for your legal interests.

Because you receive both tangible and intangible benefits from your marriage, a devastating injury to your spouse may make your life significantly worse. By understanding how a loss of consortium claim may help you better manage a heartbreaking situation, you can work to recover as well as possible from your own related injuries.